Forsaken & Forgiven – Daily Kairos

Forsaken & Forgiven


What comes to your mind when you think of Jesus' final words on the cross?

"My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Matthew 27:46)

 

What does the word forsaken make you think of?

These words weren't mere words. They were a cry that came from Jesus' very soul, as he faced something he had never known before: the separation of his Father's fellowship and the actual outpouring of the Father's wrath upon himself for our sin.

Charles Spurgeon considered this same question, with a focus on the word "you":

"'Thou:' I can understand why traitorous Judas and timid Peter should be gone, but thou, my God, my faithful friend, how canst thou leave me? This is the worst of all, yea worse than all put together. Hell itself has for its fiercest flame the separation of the soul from God."

 

We needed to read that quite a few times for it to really sink in - to really meditate on what Jesus did for us on the cross.

Jesus wasn't new to rejection. Rejection was part of his daily life here on earth. Think of Isaiah 53:5:

"He was despised and rejected by mankind, a man of suffering, and familiar with pain. Like one from who people hide their faces he was despised, and we held him in low esteem."

 

Up until the time he was nailed to the cross, Jesus had experienced rejection from so many - but never from his Father. He had lived every moment leading up to that one in conscious fellowship with God - until that moment on the cross.

The cross is where Jesus became sin (2 Corinthians 5:21) and received God's wrath upon sin and sinners. The cross had a purpose, and Jesus was nailed to it to fulfill it.

Let's just think about that for a minute...

The sound of our Savior being nailed to a cross as a sacrifice for our sins. 

Good Friday

A few years ago, when we were traveling full-time in an RV, we spent Easter weekend in Park City. We attended a Good Friday service there that I still think about every year. 

As they read through the scriptures, a wooden cross sat center stage. Upon the conclusion of the service, they asked each person to pray as long as we needed to, to write down some of our own sins, and to walk up and nail that paper to the cross.

All you could hear was dead silence - and the hammering of nails. It was a chilling and incredible powerful moment. One that really made us think upon exactly what Jesus did for us when he was pierced for our own transgressions.

What does it mean to you?

I encourage you to take some extra time today to sit with Jesus. Meditate on his finals. Go back to Psalm 22 and Matthew 27 and walk with him this Good Friday.

We know the Good News is coming in full soon, but this is part of it - a very important part.


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